Restoration/Preservation: Southeast Coast

Project with Oak Island Will Restore Salt Marsh

With grant funding through the Estuary Restoration Act, the federation will partner with the  Oak Island to build a 200-long sill made of bagged oyster shells along the Intracoastal Waterway and replant eroded marsh grass at Waterway Park in Oak Island. The project, which will be completed later this summer, will provide erosion control protection for the fringing marsh and also provide valuable habitat for oysters and the many animals that need oyster reef habitats, like crabs, and many fin fishes. 

Volunteers and the federation have already begun the process of restoration by bagging over 1,300 oyster shell bags during two events at the park.Check our Events Calendar for more opportunities to help.

Rain Gardens Help Protect Lockwoods Folly River

 
A volunteer helps plant a rain garden at  River Run Plantation.

River Run

Volunteers and the N.C. Coastal Federation staff donned waders and grabbed shovels in 2010 and 2011 to create two rain gardens and wetlands at River Run Plantation subdivision in Brunswick County.

The residents and other volunteers installed hundreds of native grasses, flowering plants, trees and shrubs in two newly built gardens at the community boat ramp adjacent to the Lockwood Folly River. 

The federation worked with residents to design and install two stormwater-reduction projects in the subdivision. The projects are designed to capture stormwater runoff from the surrounding roads, parking lots and the paved marina. This work is part of a multi-year effort to identify the sources of polluted runoff and reduce its flow. Polluted stormwater runoff is the main source of water pollution in North Carolina.

The federation led the effort in partnership with the Brunswick County Soil and Water Conservation District, Brunswick County Engineering Department and the N.C. Cooperative Extension Service. The district’s Community Conservation Assistance Program provided about $9,000 for the project through a grant from the N.C. Attorney General’s Environmental Enhancement Grant Program. The neighborhood homeowners association also contributed the necessary matching funds.

The rain gardens help to slow down and soak up the rain water flowing off the streets and parking areas that drain into the Lockwood Folly River. The stormwater, which can carry fecal coliform bacteria, sediment and other pollutants, is re-directed into the gardens and wetlands and treated before it can reach the Lockwood Folly River.  

 
A completed rain garden at River Run.

Rain gardens are excavated and prepared depressions that are planted with native trees, shrubs, grasses and flowers. They are designed to be aesthetically pleasing, provide natural habitat for birds, insects and other wildlife; promote sustainable design practices; and encourage environmental stewardship and community pride. They also serve as “living classrooms” by providing demonstrations of suitable stormwater reduction techniques that can be incorporated into backyards within the neighborhood.

Similar rain gardens were built at the Winding River subdivision in Brunswick County as part of a comprehensive effort to reduce stormwater flowing into the Lockwood Folly River. 

To tour the completed project at Winding River and/or participate in a future planting effort, contact Tracy Skrabal.

Winding River

The federation worked with residents in this subdivision to design and install two stormwater-reduction projects. The project team settled on building and planting of two large rain gardens, which were chosen and designed to capture stormwater runoff from the surrounding roads, parking areas and the paved marina. The projects are part of a multi-year effort to identify and mitigate the causes of stormwater pollution within the Lockwood Folly River watershed.

 
Volunteers plant a rain garden in Winding River.
 
The completed rain garden.

The federation is leading the effort in partnership with the Brunswick County Soil and Water Conservation District and the Brunswick County Engineering Department. The district’s Community Conservation Assistance Program provided about $20,000 for the projects, with funding provided by the N.C. Attorney General’s Environmental Enhancement Grant Program. The neighborhood homeowners associations also contributed.

The rain gardens help slow down and soak up the rain water flowing off the streets and parking areas by way of the community marina and boat ramps.  This runoff can contain fecal bacteria, sediment and other pollutants. It is now re-directed and treated by the rain gardens before it can reach the nearby headwaters of Hewletts Creek.

The rain gardens are excavated and prepared depressions that are planted with native trees, shrubs, grasses and flowers. Together with the mulch and soil, the vegetation helps capture and infiltrate stormwater runoff. Rain gardens are also designed to be aesthetically pleasing, provide natural habitat for birds, insects and other wildlife; promote sustainable design practices; and encourage environmental stewardship and community pride. They also serve as “living classrooms” by providing demonstrations on suitable stormwater reduction techniques that can be incorporated into backyard in the neighborhood.

Three Acres of Oyster Habitat to Be Restored in Lockwoods Folly

Since 2003, the federation has partnered with the N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries to restore and enhance over 27 acres of oyster reef habitat at 16 sites from the New River south to Myrtle Grove Sound. In 2012, federation will restore three acres of oyster reef habitat in the Lockwoods Folly River and two living shoreline projects on Oak Island. 

Projects Help Protect Water Quality in Stump Sound

The federation is also involved in water quality and habitat restoration projects in Stump Sound, including living shoreline projects at Morris Landing  in Onslow County, oyster reefs and a causeway removal and shellfish waters restoration project at Permuda Island in Pender County.

LID in the Community